Lucky Dip – Friday, March 9th, 2012

In Toronto:

Bistro 990 (990 Bay Street) will shut its doors on March 17th.

Vegan chef Doug McNish‘s first book Eat Raw, Eat Well will be published on March 20th. It’s available for pre-order at various online booksellers already.

Tori’s Bakeshop opens today at 2188 Queen Street East offering vegan, organic and refined sugar-free goodies like pies, cakes, cookies, donuts and more to the folks in the Beach.

You should go:

Tonight at The Depanneur (1033 College Street) the drop-in dinner is tamales by Holy Tamale. Vegan-friendly corn tamales with sweet potato, apple, onion and spices. Plus “drunken beans” and green rice – all for $10. An extra $2 will keep the carnivores happy with some chorizo.

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Lucky Dip – Tuesday, November 1st, 2011

Only in Toronto would we stop food getting to the poor because of wads and wads of red tape. Seriously, some 13 years after amalgamation, why do we still have 4 or 5 sets of bylaws on the books? Shouldn’t this have been one of the first things that was actually amalgamated? Meanwhile, poor people living in food deserts don’t get to enjoy the services of a mobile grocery truck because we can’t figure out which set of goddamned rules applies. WTF, people. [Toronto Star]

In the future, breadfruit will be the new potatoes. [Wall Street Journal]

If food bank usage can be considered a bellwether for the shape of the economy, we’re still not doing as well as we’d like. [Globe and Mail]

It’s fairly common knowledge that the UK has higher rates of alcoholism than North America, but who knew that kids were drinking more than the weekly consumption recommendations for adults – on a regular basis? [Telegraph]

Cozy, comforting and good for your diet. Soup has it all. [National Post]

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Lucky Dip – Wednesday, July 20th, 2011

It’s night market season – and if you can brave the line-ups (and possibly the hot weather) there are some good things to be had. [Globe and Mail]

For the life of me, I don’t get why people use Yelp. With stuff like this happening all the time, you can’t possibly trust anything that’s on there. [Eater]

The shareable food movement encompasses things like underground markets, pop-up restaurants and the like, but also breaks a gazillion laws when it comes to safety and sanitation. This is a list of potential ways to get around things, although many seem like more trouble than they’re worth and really depend on people being able to keep a secret. [Civil Eats]

Speaking of selling food with out a license or sanitation inspection – the history of the lemonade stand, complete with the hucksters and powdered lemonade mix. [NPR]

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