Lucky Dip – Monday, March 12th, 2012

In Toronto:

Food truck advocates all thought that parking the trucks (with permission) in a privately-owned parking lot was completely legal. Turns out there’s a weirdly obscure by-law on the books at city hall and the food truck Food Cabbie has been warned to move from their spot in a lot on Mutual Street. Oddly, someone at city hall issues the truck a permit in the first place. There’s already lots of fuss about this one, with petitions circulating. Full details, plus threats to leave Toronto by petulant and histrionic food-truck lovers, at BlogTO.

Chef Howard Dubrovsky, owner of L.A.B. Restaurant (651 College Street) announced this weekend via Twitter that yesterday (Sunday, March 11th) would be their last day of business. A closing party will take place at the restaurant on Thursday evening.

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Lucky Dip – Thursday, September 15th, 2011

Will a national food day convince people to eat better in the way that an earth day made us more aware of environmental issues? [The Atlantic]

You’ve heard of calorie counts on menus, but what about CO2 counts? Would you eat less of something at a fast food restaurant if you knew its carbon footprint? [Globe and Mail]

Is it the end of days for professional food critics? [The Atlantic Wire]

Soda, juice and booze… they’re tasty, but they’re screwing with your weight. [Toronto Star: HealthZone]

Are there too many dates on your food packages? In the UK, they’re looking to scrap the “sell-by” date and maybe the others, depending on the food. [BBC]

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Totally Fun

I have a friend who is a music journalist. Over the years, she has become quite respected in her field and is often asked to give quotes and interviews on certain bands or music-industry-related issues. She once told me that she refuses to do any interviews for print media, and will only do radio or television, preferably live. This is not, as I had joked to her, that she thought especially highly of herself, but rather that she was frustrated with her words being used out of context in print. Radio and TV allowed her to have more control over how her comments were used. And remember, she is a print journalist herself.

Which makes me wonder if they offer a course at journalism school called “How to make your subjects look like idiots through the wonders of selective editing.” Because the Globe and Mail interview I did is up, and man, did they ever do a fantastic job at making me look like an airhead. (At least in the online version you’re all spared the scary photo that makes me look like I have no neck.)

But, just to set the record straight, here are some “corrections”…

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